REN21: Renewables in Cities 2021 Global Status Report

Roughly 25% of the urban population live in a city with a renewable energy target and/or policy. City governments around the world are increasingly using renewables to help fight energy poverty, reduce air pollution, tackle climate change, and improve public health and well-being.

Please note that this article and any associated images were originally published by the REN21, here.

Over 1,300 cities, from the Americas to Sub-Saharan Africa, have demonstrated leadership in advancing renewables. National governments must give them the power to act.

Read the NEW Renewables in Cities 2021 Global Status Report.

The Renewables in Cities 2021 Global Status Report shows that more than 1 billion people – about 25% of the urban population – live in a city with a renewable energy target and/or policy.

 

 

City governments around the world are increasingly using renewables to help fight energy poverty, reduce air pollution, tackle climate change, and improve public health and well-being. They have installed, purchased and contracted for renewable energy to meet the demand of their own buildings and vehicle fleets; adopted renewable energy targets and implemented policies to incentivize local renewable energy generation and consumption; and supported urban community energy projects; and facilitated co-operation among stakeholders.

 

Urban commitments to directly support renewables are increasing. In 2020 alone, more than 260 cities either set a new renewable energy target or passed a new policy. As of the end of the year, over 830 cities in 72 countries had adopted renewable energy targets. More than 600 cities worldwide having targets for 100% renewable energy. Cities have also taken action away from fossil fuels: by 2020, over 10,500 cities had adopted targets to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and around 800 had committed to net-zero emissions. That’s an eight-fold increase on such commitments from 2019.

This report also includes key observations for our sector. Notably, the emergence of bans and restrictions on fossil fuels for heating in buildings, present in more than 53 cities worldwide and the observation that municipal governments are facilitating the expansion of district energy networks and the integration of renewable energy sources and waste heat.

We are delighted to confirm that Rana Adib, Executive Director of #REN21, will join our #21EHPcong programme as a panellist on May 5th for the session: Staying ahead of the Game: Cities in the (Thermal) Energy Transition. Learn more at https://www.ehpcongress.org/.

Related topics